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ADVENTURELOUNGE



COME FLY WITH ME

The early aircraft designs on view at AdventureLounge will take you back, though not all in one piece.



ARE YOUR SCANS limp, lifeless, lacking pep and vim? Visit ScanTips for fast, safe, effective relief.



THE ART
of Josh Agle. Martinis, girls, guns. Think James Bond meets Jetsons at a tiki bar in Palm Springs.

 
 
 
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March 2005

CLICK ON ORANGE HEADINGS TO VIEW. SITE © 1999-2012

THURSDAY, MARCH 31, 2005

≈ Larry Baranovic

We've gone from knowing next to nothing about this wonderful artist to knowing quite a bit, thanks to the inventor of the George Foreman Grill. We'll post details in the coming days. In the meantime, this illustration by Larry for Wayne Coach courtesy of Bob Johnson in Arizona.

≈ The Four Hundred for 1955

The elite of the world's motordom bow to the sophisticated Packard Four Hundred.  The opulence of the more formal Patrician is sparked by a liberal dash of spirit. The Packard Four Hundred is admired equally by country clubber and first nighter. In locker room conversations, it's discussed with all the excitement of the long wood or crisp iron shot. In the theatre foyer it's spoken of with the enthusiasm reserved for the birth of a new star. The suburbanite who seasons country living with urban spice will find the Packard Four Hundred easily adapts itself to his way of life  . . .

The alternate title here could be "Circling the Drain." The majestic 1955 and '56 Packards were the last of their breed before the company's merger with Studebaker and two years of shrunken, badge-engineered cars.

SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2005

≈ The Pride of Willow Run

Tens of  thousands of visitors have gasped to see raw steel roll in at one end of Willow Run—and to see precision-made Kaiser and Frazer cars roll away at the other end of the smooth-flowing production line  . . .

Henry J. Kaiser's Kaiser and Frazer automobiles, born in the booming postwar market, were contemporaries of the Tucker, although unlike that ill-fated car hundreds of thousands were made before the Kaiser nameplate disappeared in 1955, after a merger with Willys.

FRIDAY, MARCH 25, 2005

≈ Chiaroscuro Chrysler

Expect to be looked at  . . .  admired  . . .  and envied — when you get behind the wheel of this gorgeous, sleek and smart Chrysler Convertible Coupe. You'd have to look very far indeed to find interiors of greater swank and dash than those of the '55 Windsor Deluxe  . . .

Another of Larry Baranovic's moody, lush and luscious illustrations for Chrysler. The only place we've seen his work is in the company's mid-'50s sales catalogs and ads.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23, 2005

≈ Lucky You!

Congratulations are in order! And the owner of this newest Oldsmobile masterpiece is sure to receive his share! Here is distinction. The exclusive Accent-Styled Body by Fisher commands immediate attention, instant recognition. You travel in all the comfort and luxury that the most exacting craftsmanship can provide. The Rocket T-400 Engine, teamed with Jetaway Hydra-Matic, is ever-ready with a more-than- confident answer to the demands of modern travel  . . .

Poolside with the 1957 Oldsmobile Holiday 98 Starfire Coupe and an idealized landscape somewhere between Arcadia and Monterey. Love the glass house.

≈ Victory Over Dampness, 1944

Always under pressure  . . .  often under fire  . . .  the U.S. Army Signal Corps handles the monumental task of restoring disrupted telephone systems and setting up new ones for the Armed Forces. On the fighting front the Signal Corps saves precious time by using Davison Protek-Sorb to keep splices dry and lines free from trouble  . . .

Illustration by George Giusti (1908-1991), whose work often showed the human hand in a surreal setting.

≈ Plaskon, 1938

Plaskon is among the most versatile of molded plastics, being widely used for appliances, radio cabinets, refrigerator parts. Plaskon has a permanent lustre, unlimited color range  . . .

The painting shows a Wakefield "Commodore" illuminating reflector, which at a diameter of 26.5 inches was the largest plastic molding ever produced.

MONDAY, MARCH 21, 2005

≈ Tomorrow's Tug Boat

Remember the name Bohn—a major source for light alloys, which more and more are going into a wide variety of products. Bohn Aluminum & Brass, Detroit 26, Michigan.

You never imagined that in 1946 Bohn would foresee the Tug Boat of Tomorrow? Haha. You are silly!

SATURDAY, MARCH 19, 2005

≈ Deeper and Ever Deeper!

Spang Pipe has been used in every phase of petroleum operation since the discovery of oil in America in 1859  . . .

And no smoking afterward.

≈ Merrier-Go-Round

Aluminum and magnesium painted in gay and gaudy colors can add considerably to the gala appearance of Merry-Go- Rounds in a post-war world. By lightening construction, these alloys can decrease the cost of operation  . . .

Of course you can hardly walk out the door these days without tripping over a magnesium merry-go-round, but once upon a time the refrain on everyone's lips was: "What this country needs is streamlined carnival rides!"

FRIDAY, MARCH 18, 2005

≈ Possible Tractor of Tomorrow

Amazing new developments in every branch of industry will mean the much wider use of light alloys fabricated by Bohn.

From 1947 comes another eye-popper from Bohn Aluminum's seemingly endless catalog of  futuristic renderings, airbrushed by what looks to have been an extremely talented 10-year-old.

≈ Atlantic Clipper, 1938

From aviation illustrator Charles Hubbell, a sneak peek at the Boeing 314, which as Pan Am's "Clipper" flying boat was the first airplane to offer scheduled trans-oceanic passenger service. (Previously the only aircraft offering passage between Europe and America were zeppelins, which stopped flying after the Hindenburg disaster in 1937.) The Clipper, which was the largest passenger plane of its day (three levels capable of carrying 74 first-class passengers and a crew of 10), ended service after only three months in operation when war broke out in Europe in September 1939. Only a dozen Clippers were built; the last was scrapped in 1951. After its merger with Ramo-Wooldridge in the late 1950s, Thompson Products, which commissioned this illustration, became the T in TRW.

THURSDAY, MARCH 17, 2005

≈ Mars Snooper

Are you an engineer? Arma needs key men to augment a broad research program in missile guidance and space technology. As designer and developer of inertial navigation systems for Titan and Atlas ICBMs, Arma provides a stim- ulating atmosphere where creative talents can develop  . . .

≈ Atomic Pulse Rocket

The Atomic Pulse Rocket could transport payloads to the Moon at $6.74 per pound, less than one quarter the prevailing air freight charges over equivalent distance  . . .

≈ Space Cowboys

ARMA, now providing the inertial guidance system for the Atlas ICBM, is in the vanguard of the race to outer space. For this effort, ARMA needs scientists and engineers experienced in astronautics  . . .

≈ "For Cushioned Comfort"

Just imagine if your last sight on this earth was of the
Knapp Shoes car bearing down on you. From the 1960s, an accident scene photo from Salem County, New Jersey. Caption on back: "Upper Penns Neck fatal. Pic by Dave Trostel for UPN Police." The car is a 1960 Chevrolet station wagon.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16, 2005

≈ Carbecue

From the 1950s, a crash scene photo showing the aftermath of a head-on collision between two ragtops, a 1955 Chevrolet and 1956 Cadillac. The Cadillac, which has a New Jersey tag, burned. No word on fatalities, but it doesn't look good. Back then, the "crumple zone" was pretty much the entire car.

TUESDAY, MARCH 15, 2005

≈ Bohn Boat

With the changes foreseen in the world of tomorrow, the modern ship will also undergo a complete transformation. Light alloys have been responsible for so many wonders, no one can foresee the wide uses to which they may be put  . . .

SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2005

≈ Retro Rocket

Authorities predict that aircraft designs of tomorrow will be of the advanced rocket type. The new rocket models will permit much higher speeds at much higher altitudes. Thus new developments which require light alloys keep opening up avenues for improved products. When peace comes, Bohn metallurgists and engineers should be helpful to you in designing your products for tomorrow  . . . 

SATURDAY, MARCH 12, 2005

≈ The doorbell rings.

It may be friends, dropping by for a visit. Or, you may open the door on the unexpected, and find yourself facing a gun. The "doorbell" technique has long been a favorite with holdup men. It catches you off guard, makes you, your family and guests easy prey for robbery. One way to protect yourself is to install a door chain and make callers identify themselves before you open the door. But even this is not foolproof. The surest way to protect yourself against loss from "unexpected callers" is through insurance  . . .

FRIDAY, MARCH 11, 2005

≈ Look Out for Those Clouds!

YOU'RE skimming straight for the horizon! A warm wind
softly fans your face as you soar to the crest of the hill. And stretching below you are ribbons of roads, trees that dwindle to pencils  . . .  Watch out—or you'll bump into one of those big, billowy clouds! You're driving a 1941 Lincoln-Zephyr, mister, and that means you're riding high!

≈ Salute to Memphis, 1943

Details concerning the type and performance of aircraft soon to roll out on our runways at the new McDonnell Plant in Memphis are, of military necessity, restricted. But you may be sure that these aircraft will play an important role in hastening the day of victory for America and our Allies. That's our job in Memphis, now. But one day, when victory has been won and peacetime transportation is resumed, the old river city will become an important ocean port—in the Ocean of the Air  . . .

≈ Brass for the Two-Edged Sword

Yes, oil is a mighty two-edged sword that carries double cutting power in attacks on the enemy today. For it is a source of both gasoline and synthetic rubber. And to keep refinery production of these two vital materials at the keenest edge of efficiency, tons and tons of copper alloy heat exchanger and condenser tubing are required  . . .

THURSDAY, MARCH 10, 2005

≈ SUPER-SERVICE, 1943

A super service-station of tomorrow: Automobiles will be serviced on the ground floor—helicopters on the roof. After Victory, the Bohn organization will turn its attention to a wide variety of new developments like the one above  . . .

Artwork by George W. Walker, who would go on to become styling chief and vice president of Ford Motor Co. Lettering above the service bays reads: REPAIR, WASH, LUBE.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 9, 2005

≈ New World for Sale

SOMEWHERE  . . .  closer than you think  . . .  there's
a bright new world awaiting you  . . .  with a wind that's soft
and nights that are like friendly velvet robes. And there's
a thrilling car to whisk you in ease and comfort to this land
of warmth and sunshine  . . .  give you the smoothest
fun-flight to summertime you've ever known. It's that
exciting new traveler, that sleek, flashing thoroughbred
. . .  the 1941 Lincoln-Zephyr!

MONDAY, MARCH 7, 2005

≈ 1965 Scrabblemobile

Your air conditioner, television and other appliances are just the beginning of a new electric age. Your food will cook in seconds instead of hours. Electricity will close your windows at the first drop of rain. Lamps will cut on and off automatically to fit the lighting needs in your rooms. Television "screens" will hang on the wall. By 1965, you will need and have much more electricity than you have today  . . .

SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 2005

≈ The Archive

Housekeeping update: Posts for the current and previous month will be on this page; anything older than that gets trundled off to the Plan59 Archive.  Links to which can be found at the top and bottom of the page. Please, no food or drink in the Archive, and no loud talking.

SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 2005

≈ The Sweethearts' Pal

From a 1953 sampler of calendar proofs comes this uncharacteristically chaste illustration by pinup artist
Art Frahm, who was a pioneering investigator into the
effects of celery and gravity on waistband elastic.

THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2005

≈ TV in the Trees, 1962

The first large-screen portable TV you don't have to plug in. (It's all transistor—no tubes.) This portable television really earns the right to be called portable. An amazing rechargeable Energy Cell makes it independent of electric outlets. That's why it's right at home in the modern tree terrace illustrated.

≈ Vibrasonic

An unusual word you should understand before buying a stereo hi-fi. Most of the sounds from a stereo do not go directly from the loudspeakers to your ears. The notes are "bounced" off walls, ceiling and floor. So what you hear is actually what engineers call reflected sound energy. This is why it's important for you to know about Vibrasonic. It is a special sound system you will find only in Motorola stereo hi-fi. No matter what the acoustics of your room, a twist of the Vibrasonic dial and you can be sure of hearing music rich in tone, exactly as it was played  . . .

≈ Herman Miller Time

From 1961, another in the series of architectural fantasies painted by Charles Schridde (who also illustrated the 1959 Imperial brochure) for Motorola's "Lively Art of Electronics" campaign. To the left are a pair of George Nelson "coconut" chairs, designed for the Herman Miller furniture company in 1955. They retail nowadays for $3495. Gulp.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2005

≈ Home James  . . .  Junior!

HE QUITE forgets that sweet, lingering look she lavished on Pinky Hodgons when he cut in on her favorite waltz. And it
no longer matters that he was really pretty ragged on the rumba  . . .  For it's a velvet night, spattered with stars  . . .
And no queen of old ever entered her carriage with a more regal manner than his lovely lady of the evening as she steps into Dad's 1941 Lincoln-Zephyr  . . .

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